Tag Archives: WWII

WWII Movie Nostalgia

WWII – Over the past two nights, I have watched a pair of movies set in WWII. The first is one of my favorite WWII movies, “The Longest Day” which premiered in 1962. I think I saw that one in the theater as a kid. It is full of stars from the early ’60s and tells the story of D-Day from both the Allied and German perspective. It is one of my favorite WWII era movies and I try to watch it once a year. IMDB rates it at 7.8/10.

The other is not as good but was interesting. The 1943 “Aerial Gunner”. The IMDB synopsis:

Old rivals are pitted against each other in basic training and fight for the same woman.

It is not nearly as good (rating only a 5.7/10 on IMDB).

Both of these films are shot in Black & White.


If you are interested in the World War II era of history, you may find my pages “World War II Sources” (a collection of museums, websites, Facebook pages, and Twitter feeds with information on the World War II era in history) and “World War II Timeline” of interest.

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Short World War II Film – “Prisoner of War”

Short FilmWWII – I came across the short (12:42) World War II film “Prisoner of War”. This film was uploaded to YouTube in September of 2011 by mbfilmsuk. The synopsis of the film from IMDB:

1941, a cold dawn, and two German soldiers, a Captain and a Private, are out hunting somewhere on the Eastern Front. The Captain lists all the possible animals that they might find in the deep forest lands around them. However today he is only interested in the spoor of the one sort of animal: man. Prisoners have escaped; they must be found, and dealt with. When it comes to the crunch will the private once more fail in his duty or will he be given a second chance, and who will be anointed with the blood of the first kill?

I thought that this was a very well done film, though all of the dialog is in German. English subtitles are provided so the film is easy to understand. The film is rated as 6.6 on IMDB.

 


 

If you are a student of the World War II era in history, you may find my pages “World War II Sources” (a collection of museums, websites, Facebook pages, and Twitter feeds with information on the World War II era in history) and “World War II Timeline” of interest.

Book Review: “Hitler’s Secret Weapons of Mass Destruction: The Nazi Plan for Final Victory”

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Book ReviewsWWII – “Hitler’s Secret Weapons of Mass Destruction: The Nazi Plan for Final Victory” eBook was published in 2018 and was written by Michael Fitzgerald.

I received an ARC of this novel through https://www.netgalley.com in return for a fair and honest review. I categorize this book as ‘G’. This book talks about the various projects undertaken by the German Third Reich to create weapons that would turn the tide of World War II.

The first part of the book addressed aircraft, rockets, and armored vehicles that were either developed or which had been designed. Then some of the more far-fetched research efforts were addressed including “flying saucers”, unusual aircraft, and working atomic weapons.

I thought that the 6 hours I spent reading this 240-page non-fiction book were interesting. While many of the projects discussed were ones I had heard of elsewhere, there were several that, to me, left the non-fiction and crept into the realm of conspiracy theory and pure fiction. The selected cover art is well chosen. I give this novel a 2.5 (rounded up to a 3) out of 5.

My book reviews are also published on Goodreads (https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/31181778-john-purvis).


If you are a student of the World War II era in history, you may find my pages “World War II Sources” (a collection of museums, websites, Facebook pages, and Twitter feeds with information on the World War II era in history) and “World War II Timeline” of interest.

Home Front – Wartime recipes (2)

WWII – More interesting WWII era recipes that I wanted to share


If you are a student of the World War II era in history, you may find my pages “World War II Sources” (a collection of museums, websites, Facebook pages, and Twitter feeds with information on the World War II era in history) and “World War II Timeline” of interest.


 

Pacific Paratrooper

From: The 1940’s Experiment .

We discussed rationing and we’ve discussed just how well our parents and grandparents ate – despite the rationing and time of war when all the “good” stuff was going overseas!  So …. as promised, here are some more of the wonderful recipes from the 1940’s.

Please thank Carolyn on her website for putting these delicious meals on-line!

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Book Review: “Mr.​ Campion’s War”

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Book Reviews – “Mr. Campion’s War” eBook was published in 2018 (December) and was written by Mike Ripley (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mike_Ripley). Mr. Ripley has published nearly twenty-five novels. The Campion stories were originally written by Margery Allingham, then her husband Philip Youngman Carter. Mr. Ripley was engaged to complete an unfinished manuscript. Since then he has written four more Campion novels.

I received an ARC of this novel through https://www.netgalley.com in return for a fair and honest review. I categorize this novel as ‘R’ because it contains scenes of Violence. The story is mostly in World War II era France. The main character is Albert Campion.

Campion is celebrating his seventieth birthday in current time and has called together several people from his past. Close friends and family know little about some of Camion’s escapades when he was younger. In particular, they have no idea of his exploits in occupied France during World War II.

Campion is sent to Vichy France to make contact with Freiherr Robert von Ringer, a German intelligence officer. Ringer is no traitor but wants to stop substantial currency transfers being made to smuggle funds out of occupied Europe. Campion, though not a trained spy, must help free a Jewish banker and his family before he can get the information needed to stop the transfer of funds. Not only must he be cautious of the German secret police, but also of the French underworld gangs.

The past comes back to haunt Campion when one of his birthday party guests is attacked.  A plot initiated in the 1940s plays out today.

I thoroughly enjoyed the 8+ hours I spent reading this 280-page WWII thriller. I enjoyed this novel and, frankly, would like to read more in this series. While this novel has many prior books in the series, it reads well on its own. I like the cover art. I give this novel a 4.5 (rounded up to a 5) out of 5.

My book reviews are also published on Goodreads (https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/31181778-john-purvis).


If you are a student of the World War II era in history, you may find my pages “World War II Sources” (a collection of museums, websites, Facebook pages, and Twitter feeds with information on the World War II era in history) and “World War II Timeline” of interest.

Thanksgiving – Then and Now

WWII – I thought that GP Cox gave another good snapshot of what Thanksgiving was like for servicemen during WWII and wanted to share it.

No matter what the timeframe, our service men and women must sacrifice time with their families to defend us. Thanking them should be part of our Thanksgiving as well.

Pacific Paratrooper

WWII vs Afghanistan

THEN – WWII

Stanley Collins, US Navy: “I was on submarine duty in the Pacific in the year 1943. We were in the area off the cost of the Philippines. I remember having a complete turkey dinner on Thanksgiving. While the turkeys were cooking, the submarine took a dive. We went down too steeply and the turkeys fell out of the oven onto the deck. The cook picked them up and put them back into the oven — and we ate them, regardless of what may have gotten on them as a result of their fall. That meal was so good!”

Ervin Schroeder, 77th Infantry Division, 3rd Battalion, I Company, US Army: “On Thanksgiving Day, we made our landing on Leyte Island in the Philippines very early in the morning. We therefore missed our dinner aboard ship. Somewhere down the beach from where we landed, the Navy…

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Celebrating Thanksgiving in the Southwest Pacific

WWII – I thought that IHRA site gave a good snapshot of what Thanksgiving was like in the Pacific Theater during WWII and wanted to share it.

No matter what the timeframe, our service men and women must sacrifice time with their families to defend us. Thanking them should be part of our Thanksgiving as well.

IHRA

As the men in the Southwest Pacific fought the Japanese during World War II, they spent major holidays and birthdays far away from their families and friends. These holidays weren’t always a break from routine missions, but they were a brief respite from the bland food typically served in the mess hall. We’ve gathered some diary entries from Thanksgiving Day in 1943 and 1944. Happy Thanksgiving!

Harry E. Terrell, 405/38
11/23/44, Morotai, clear.
“Today is Thanksgiving! I got up at 9:00 and Stanley, Shrout, Zombie and I started laying the rest of the floor. We put up the uprights and knocked off for chow. We finished the tent in the afternoon and cleaned up in time for Thanksgiving dinner! We had turkey, spuds, peas, buns, fruit salad, pumpkin pie and coffee – it was “The nuts” with a white table-cloth, candles and ferns! We’re observing blackouts at sunset now. The…

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Thanksgiving in WWII

Thanksgiving in WWII

WWII – I came across the post “Thanksgiving in World War II” by Sarah Sundin yesterday. I wish I could have Reblogged it, but her site doesn’t support that. I do encourage you to visit the post if you are interested in the WWII period.

The article brings out different aspects of Thanksgiving experienced during the war years.


If you are a student of the World War II era in history, you may find my pages “World War II Sources” (a collection of museums, websites, Facebook pages, and Twitter feeds with information on the World War II era in history) and “World War II Timeline” of interest.

Book Review: “Burma: The Forgotten War”

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Book Reviews – “Burma: The Forgotten War” eBook was published in 2018 (original paper edition published in 2004) and was written by Jon Latimer. Mr. Latimer published several non-fiction books.

I received an ARC of this novel through https://www.netgalley.com in return for a fair and honest review. I categorize this novel as ‘R’ because it contains scenes of violence. The book covers the years of World War II detailing actions taken in what was then Burma (now known a Myanmar).

Most of what I have read regarding World War II has been either centered on the European Theater or the Pacific Theater and focused on the forces of the US. Most of the Burma campaigns were centered around British or Commonwealth ground forces, though the US played a major role in the air engagements.

I thought that the 16.5+ hours I spent reading this 961-page history were interesting. The page count seems high, but the last third of the book was citations of reference. Certainly, there was a lot of information presented that I had not known about before. Some history books are presented in a very readable fashion. I have reviewed a few of those in the past. This was not one of those books.

This was very dry. It is filled with names, dates, and locations. The fact that the locations are for places I had never heard of did not help. Also, I found that the numerical military unit references used for both British and Japanese units was very confusing. I also felt that the book was very choppy, jumping back and forth in time.

If you are researching military efforts in Burma during WWII, you will find this a very useful book. It does a good job of conveying the misery that troops of both sides had to endure for most of the Burma war efforts.  The perspective presented on the war and especially the Commonwealth troops engaged in it very British. The chosen cover art is OK. I give this novel a 3 out of 5 based on general readability.

My book reviews are also published on Goodreads (https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/31181778-john-purvis).


If you are a student of the World War II era in history, you may find my pages “World War II Sources” (a collection of museums, websites, Facebook pages, and Twitter feeds with information on the World War II era in history) and “World War II Timeline” of interest.

Book Review: “Ian Fleming and Operation Golden Eye”

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Book Reviews – “Ian Fleming and Operation Golden Eye” eBook was published in 2018 and was written by Mark Simmons. Mr. Simmons has published a dozen books.

I received an ARC of this novel through https://www.netgalley.com in return for a fair and honest review. I categorize this novel as ‘G’. This is the true story of novelist Ian Fleming and the work he did during World War II for British Intelligence to keep Spain from entering the war as an ally to Germany.

While the focus is on how Spain was convinced to stay out of the war, many of the exploits of Fleming and other intelligence agents are shown to be the basis for his later fictional intelligence agent, James Bond. I was a fan of Fleming’s Bond novels and found this background information a bonus to the World War II era history. This non-fiction book goes into great detail as to the efforts of the British to keep Spain neutral.

I enjoyed the 7.5 hours I spent reading this 256-page non-fiction account of World War II intrigue. I thought it was a little chaotic at the beginning and jumped around a bit. As with many non-fiction historical books, there were many names, places, and dates mentioned. Despite this, I still feel that it was a very readable book. This is one aspect of World War II that I had not previously known much about. I like the chosen cover art. I give this novel a 3.8 (rounded up to a 4) out of 5.

My book reviews are also published on Goodreads (https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/31181778-john-purvis).


If you are a student of the World War II era in history, you may find my pages “World War II Sources” (a collection of museums, websites, Facebook pages, and Twitter feeds with information on the World War II era in history) and “World War II Timeline” of interest.