Tag Archives: Reading

Author Interview – Maxx Powr

(See my other Author Interviews) – I read the novel “The Promise” a few weeks ago. After I published my review I contacted the author who uses the pen name  Maxx Powr. He graciously agreed to an interview.

Myself: When did you first realize that you wanted to become a writer?

Powr: I had some encouragement in high school from my English teacher, but never really pursued it. Working as a programmer later in life, I decided to write a childrens’ book, or 2. I submitted the books (over the transom back then) to publishers and received more encouragement, but also rejections. Life intervened and writing was put on hold for years, until Fairalon under the pen name T.J. Roberts. This was a childrens’ book and I needed a new pen name for The Promise, so children wouldn’t think it was a sequel. The Promise does have language and sexual situations and I didn’t want them to be shocked.

Myself: My background is also in IT and Software Development. What is the first piece that you remember writing?

Powr: The Flight of the Dodo. MG/YA adventure for boys. I may actually rework that one as I really liked it, and so did the publisher I sent it to.

Myself: What is your academic and work background?

Powr: I hold a masters degree in Rehabilitation Counseling. I’ve worked as an Emergency Crisis Intervention Counselor, Children and Adult Family Therapist, Programmer, Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor, and then started 2 companies, which I still manage.

Myself: What part of the world do you currently live in?

Powr: Southern California

Myself: Do you think that living there has affected your writing?

Powr: Not really. When I write, I live in the book on the screen. 

Myself: How do you relax? What are your hobbies?

Powr: Video games (COD),  3d art, photography

Myself: What’s the earliest book you remember reading for yourself?

Powr: Treasure Island comes to mind. 

Myself: Did you read much growing up?

Powr: Reading was required in my schools, assigned reading; some good some not.  I was an avid comic book reader for fun, much to my parents’ chagrin. 

Myself: What have you read recently?

Powr: Making Comics by Scott Mcloud

Myself: What is your favorite genre? book? character? author?

Powr: Sci-Fi and Fantasy. I don’t really have a favorite book, character or author. 

Myself: While I read a great deal of WWII era history, Science Fiction and Fantasy are my favorite genres of novels too. Where is your favorite place to read?

Powr: On our porch.

Myself: Do you prefer paper or eBooks? Do you listen to audiobooks?

Powr: I like paper books, but I’m buying more ebooks to support other Indies. I have listened to audiobooks, and I like it best when the author reads it.

Myself: What books do you recommend to others? Give as gifts

Powr:Typically, mine. 🙂

Myself: What makes you sit down and want to share your stories?

Powr: I just like to write stories that thrill me, things I would like to see in a movie. Basically, the stories play out like a movie in my head, The Promise is a good example of that. Once I start, the characters often take me down an unsuspected road, saying things that surprise me. I love that part of it.

Myself: What are your ambitions for your writing career?

Powr: I don’t think I’m like a lot of writers, I’m not that ambitious about my writing career. Sure, it would be nice to see my books made into movies, but that is just a dream. I just want to tell some stories that get people jazzed. I don’t expect to be the next big thing. If people enjoy them, I’ll be happy.

Myself: I certainly found your novel enjoyable and a fun read. Why do you write? What makes you sit down and want to share your stories?

Powr: It’s a little selfish but I write for myself. I’ve found that overall people tend to like what I like so it works for me.

Myself: Is there anyone who has influenced your writing?

Powr: Everyone has influenced my writing. One particular author? No. 

Myself: How did you pick the genres for your stories?

Powr: I love Sci-Fi and I love Fantasy. For me, it’s an escape to a world of ‘if only.’

Myself: Where do your story ideas come from?

Powr: Weirdly, some come from 3d art. I like to ‘play’ with 3d programs called Poser and Iclone. You can create scenes that you see in your head without artistic ability to draw. I admire people who can just draw what they think of, but my stick figures don’t really cut it.

Myself: Do you work to an outline or plot or do you prefer just to see where an idea takes you?

Powr: I generally start with one scene that I really like. That scene leads to another, which leads to a former scene. If they are good enough, I start playing with an outline for the arc of the story and the character arc, though they often argue with me.

Myself: Where do you do your writing? Why there?

Powr: I basically have 3 jobs. I have a bit of a cave set up under my house. Window is blocked with an AC unit, so it’s dark in there, except for my multiple screens. I work on computers and answer a phone as needed. It can be disruptive, but I find time in between to write.

Myself: What is your schedule like when you are writing?

Powr: I laughed when I read that. My schedule is whenever I have a moment. But, once I get caught up in the scene, I usually don’t stop until that scene is completed.

Myself: How do you fit writing into your daily schedule? (i.e. balance work, writing and family)

Powr: I write between tasks. It honestly stinks, because there are times when it’s flowing and you get interrupted. It is what it is.

Myself: About how long does it take you to complete a first draft? How long do your revisions take?

Powr: Probably a year for the first draft, a year for the final product. I like to create the scenes in 3d, and that can get pretty demanding timewise.

Myself: I see on your web sites that you have posted some of your 3D art. Have you thought of including some of those images in your novels?

Powr: If you take a look at Fairalon, you’ll see all the images in the book are presented on the web site in higher resolution 1 for each chapter. Also, the cover and back of the book open up to one big image of the road to grandma’s house, with Charlie swinging and Iris in the back seat watching. * (You can see them all on www.Fairalon.com so you don’t have to buy the book to see them). However, tremendous spoilers ahead in the images. I recommend looking at the images in a color reader like Kindle Fire or such, or the hard copy has printed color images. You can also read the text in a B&W kindle, nook or whatever, and then look at the images online. I put them there for people who didn’t have color readers, but do have computers with color monitors.

As for the Adult Sci Fi, like The Promise, most adult Sci-Fi books don’t include images. The images on the book cover and back are 3d art I created. (On the back is Sheen in her regen machine with Chase 523, the front is The Promise going through a wormhole)

There are arguments on both sides, such as leaving it up to the reader’s imagination versus showing them in a picture. I really like creating the images. It’s like walking around inside the scene in my head. It’s also very challenging to get anything that looks really good. My latest of Sheen is an image I really like. She looks real (to me).

Myself: That is a very lifelike image. I can understand the added cost and time involved with including your images in print. Perhaps though some could be included in your ebooks. How much research do you put into a novel?

Powr: It depends. I found that The Promise took more research than Fairalon, but I research as needed and try not to fall into interesting rabbit holes.

Myself: What tools (software?) do you use in your writing?

Powr: I prefer WordPerfect, but had to switch to Word because all the editors use it. I’ve started using Grammarly and ProWritingAid and they are both very good.

Myself: I have been using Grammarly as well and really like it. Using it has improved my writing. What are the hardest and easiest things about writing?

Powr: Hardest: Finding the time to write.  Easiest: I enjoy writing dialogue, for some strange reason.

Myself: What advice would you give to an aspiring author?

Powr: Keep your day job as long as you can. From what I’ve read it can take 10 years to acquire an agent. 10 years! And that doesn’t mean you’ll be published. You need to eat, pay bills, and if you go Indie, pay for marketing your book. Don’t go nuts foregoing a normal life. It is good to keep a balance.

Myself: What novels/works have you published?

Powr: Fairalon MG/YA Fantasy Adventure
The Promise Adult Sci-Fi Action Adventure

Myself: What are you currently working on?

Powr: Return to Fairalon Because High School is a Creep Show (working title) and a sequel to The Promise, no working title as yet

Myself: What else would you like to share?

Powr: If you feel like you would like to write a book, that’s great. Don’t expect to be the next J.K. Rowling, but it’s okay to have a dream.
Do it for you.

The best advice that I stumbled across on my own is this: When it’s done, final version #158, grab an audio program and record the book as if you were reading it for an audiobook. Try your best to read it with inflection. You don’t have to do voices or sound effects. Read it like you are reading it to a friend. Now that you have finished recording all the chapters, (it takes a long time) take some time to listen. You will hear things that are like nails on a chalkboard, or music to your ears, depending upon how much editing you have done. Fix it. Re-record and listen again. If you are lucky, you won’t have that much to do. If not, you will be so glad you didn’t send it to an editor.

Myself: That is very good advice! How should your fans follow you or get in touch?

Powr: I have web sites for Fairalon www.Fairalon.com and www.PiecerChronicles.com. The Fairalon site has an email link (fairlontjroberts@gmail.com) and the PiecerChronicles site has a form.

Myself: I see you have a MeWe link on your PiecerChronicles website. I have recently added that social platform as well.

Powr: I’m really only going to be there from now on, or the main web sites. I prefer MeWe to Facebook, (no ads).

INTERVIEW with Author – Avanti Centrae

(See my other author Interviews) – I have had the opportunity to read two novels by author Avanti Centrae. The first was “VanOps: The Lost Power” and the second, earlier this year, “Solstice Shadows”. They were both enjoyable reads so I reached out to Ms. Centrae and asked for an interview.

Myself: When did you first realize that you wanted to become a writer?

Centrae: Mom taught me to read along with tying my shoes, and I wrote my first story when I was quite young, maybe six years old. Becoming a published novelist was a life-long dream.

Myself: What is the first piece that you remember writing?

Centrae: That early story was about a bull and a red cape. My writing has matured since then.  😊

Myself: What is your academic and work background?

Centrae: To fund my addiction for international travel and fast BMW’s, I studied computer technology at Purdue University and worked in IT for twenty years. I eventually led a team as an executive at Hewlett Packard before leaving the corporate world to pursue my writing career.

Myself: My career was in IT as well. What part of the world do you currently live in?

Centrae: Northern California is my current home. I was born and raised in the Midwest, and have lived in California since I finished college.

Myself: Do you think that living there has affected your writing?

Centrae: A bigger influence has been all the international travel. Besides the United States, I’ve enjoyed most of western Europe, and parts of Canada, Central America, and New Zealand. Walking around with only a backpack on my shoulders and exploring other cultures has been a huge inspiration.

Myself: You have had a wondeful opportunity to explore the world. I can see how both your technical background and your travels have been woven into your novels. How do you relax? What are your hobbies?

Centrae: We just returned from a holiday in Lake Tahoe where we hiked nearly every day and spent some time at the beach. Quite relaxing! My German shepherd and little black dog provide constant entertainment. I also enjoying riding my road bike and pursuing the scent of adventure.

Myself: What else would you like to share about yourself?

Centrae: One of my favorite jobs was working as a white-water raft guide, saving passengers from the rapids of the American River. One midnight, my fellow raft guides and I dared a moonlit run. The river ran high, a boat flipped, and we all nearly ended up in a rapid aptly named Satan’s Cesspool!

Myself: That sounds like quite the adventure. Did you read much growing up?

Centrae: All the time. I’d bring home stacks of books from the bookmobile and devour one almost every day.

Myself: What book that you read as a child stands out in your memory? 

Centrae: Mom helped me memorize The Night Before Christmas when I was young, and we’d recite it together during the holiday season. Later, I read The Chronicles of Narnia, and pieces of those stories still come to mind.

Myself: What have you read recently?

Centrae: I recently listened to The King’s Deception by Steve Berry and really enjoyed the blend of action and history. Another fun read was The Freedom Broker by K.J. Howe, featuring Thea Paris, a kidnap and ransom specialist. It was a blast.

Myself: What is your favorite genre and author?

Centrae: I love action thrillers. All the Sigma Force books by James Rollins rank up there, and lately I’ve been appreciating Ernest Dempsey’s Sean Wyatt character.

Myself: Where is your favorite place to read?

Centrae: I love to curl up on the couch in front of a fire in the winter, or during the summer, I like to be outside on the back patio in a hammock.

Myself: Do you listen to audiobooks?

Centrae: These days I mostly listen to audiobooks while I drive or do chores. Tim Campbell is the “Voice of VanOps” and has done an amazing job bringing my stories to life.

Myself: What books do you recommend to others?

Centrae: I was saddened to hear that Carlos Ruiz Zafron recently passed away. His Cemetery of Forgotten Books series makes an excellent gift for readers who like atmospheric suspense.

Myself: What makes you sit down and want to share your stories?

Centrae: Authors have always been my heroes and characters my best friends. I want to return the favor and keep readers company on dark nights. 

Myself: I like that sentiment. Is there anyone who has influenced your writing?

Centrae: Besides the authors I’ve noted above, I’ve also been influenced by Agatha Christie, P.D. James, Robert Jordan, Terry Pratchett, Clive Cussler, Dan Brown, J.R.R Tolkien, Gregg Hurwitz, and Ian Fleming. My tastes are eclectic, and I’ve also enjoyed a lot of non-fiction.

Myself: That list contains many of my own favorites. How did you pick the genres for your stories?

Centrae:I’ve always been fascinated with psychology, mysticism, mysteries, conspiracies, history, and science. Toss in a lust for adventure, and it was pretty easy to choose action thrillers.

Myself: Where do your story ideas come from?

Centrae: The idea for Solstice Shadows came from an article I read about a young man who discovered an ancient secret about a star chart. That formed the kernel of the story and I added on from there.

Myself: Do you work to an outline or plot or do you prefer just to see where an idea takes you?

Centrae: I’m a big outliner. By the time I start writing, it’s like a just-add-water recipe where I throw in dialogue and description.

Myself: Where do you do your writing? Why there?

Centrae: Often, I write outside on my smartphone, and then edit inside on the computer. I’m more relaxed and less distracted when I’m outdoors. The prologue to Solstice Shadows came to me during a hike and I stopped, sat on a rock, and wrote most of the chapter right then!

Myself: What is your schedule like when you are writing?

Centrae: Days always seem to fill up with marketing and promotional activities, but I try to limit that to mornings and write in the afternoons.

Myself: About how long does it take you to complete a first draft? How long do your revisions take?

Centrae: The first draft of my debut novel took years, but now that I know what I’m doing, I wrote the draft of my latest novel in about three months. Revisions can take time, too. My publisher hires world-class editors and I like to get feedback from beta readers. It also helps me to set the story aside for awhile and come back to it with fresh eyes.

Myself: How much research do you put into a novel?

Centrae: Because my novels include science and history, I spend months researching the stories.

Myself: What tools (software?) do you use in your writing?

Centrae: I just use WORD.

Myself: What are the hardest and easiest things about writing?

Centrae: The hardest part for me is getting the first draft done. Once I have words on the page, the editing is a lot easier. My favorite is the research and outlining. It’s great fun when all the plot twists come together.

Myself: What advice would you give to an aspiring author?

Centrae: Expect to spend time learning how to market your books, or hire PR and marketing experts, because even the Big Five these days expects you to do the heavy lifting when it comes to marketing and public relations.

Myself: What novels/works have you published? 

 (Black Opal Books, 11/9/19) – The Lost Power:  Da Vinci Code meets Tomb Raider in the instant Barnes and Noble Nook bestseller that #1 New York Times bestselling author James Rollins called, “Full of action and suspense.”

(Thunder Creek Press, 8/11/20) – Solstice Shadows: A computer-app designer. An encrypted relic. Can she decipher the dangerous code before extremists trigger a high-tech apocalypse?

Myself: What are you currently working on?

Centrae: I’ve just completed the first draft of a novel in a new series called Kiss of the Cobra: When a misfit team of Mensa-level operatives digs up a ruthless plot seeded in Cleopatra’s time, can they stop the countdown to a civil war?

Myself: That sounds very interesting. I look forward to reading it. Have you won any writing awards?

Centrae: The Lost Power took home a genre grand prize ribbon at the 2017 Chanticleer International Book Awards, a bronze medal at the 2019 Wishing Shelf Awards, and an Honorable Mention at the 2018 Hollywood Book Festival. Solstice Shadows is a Global Thriller finalist for the upcoming Chanticleer International Book Awards.

Myself: That is very impressive for your first two novels. What else would you like to share?

Centrae: Here’s a few blurbs and the buy links for my books:

“A tantalizing new series that combines historical mystery and cutting-edge science into a masterwork of international intrigue.” ~ James Rollins, the #1 New York Times bestselling author of The Last Odyssey

“Avanti Centrae packs a thriller parachute with endless suspense and a rip-cord ending. SOLSTICE SHADOWS is meticulously researched, the history, science, and locales offering a rare ‘you-are-there’ authenticity. Brew a large pot of java, as you will read through the night. Brilliant.” — K.J. Howe, international bestselling author of SKYJACK

“Fast-paced action adventure with an ancient mystery at its heart — fans of Dan Brown and Steve Berry will love the VanOps thrillers.” ~ J.F. Penn, USA Today bestselling author of the ARKANE thrillers
 
“Avanti Centrae is a name to watch. Powerful, evocative, gripping storytelling with characters you immediately relate to, love, or loathe.” ~ Ernest Dempsey, the USA Today bestselling author of the Sean Wyatt adventure series
 
“Fans of complex and highly detailed espionage and action thrillers are certain to dive right into this mixture between Indiana Jones and Dan Brown.” ~ Readers’ Favorite – Five stars

https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/solstice-shadows

https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/solstice-shadows-avanti-centrae/1137065083?ean=2940163068982

https://www.indiebound.org/book/9781734966213

Myself: How should your fans follow you or get in touch?

Centrae: I love to hear from my fans. Here are my Social Media Links:

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/avanticentrae

Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/avanticentrae

Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/avanti.centrae.author

Here’s a link to first six chapters of THE LOST POWER and/or my newsletter – http://eepurl.com/dIan8L 

Today is National Read a Book Day

 

NATIONAL-READ-A-BOOK-DAY-September-6

(See my other Reading related posts) – Take today to enjoy a book! As said on the National Day Calander website:

[Today is] A day for all those who love to read, National Read a Book Day invites us ALL to grab a book we might enjoy and spend the day reading.  

Their recommendations for observance:

Sit back, relax, and READ! Don’t forget to share the joy of reading with young people in your life. Inspire them with your favorite novel or find out about the last book they took off the shelf. Read to the littlest of the up and coming readers, too. And share what your reading too! Need more ways to celebrate? We’ve got them!

  • Shop for a new title to read or explore the shelves for one you would like to give.
  • Explore the shelves of used book stores. You might find an out of print tome that might become the highlight of your collection.
  • Discover the world of online book stores. Their stock includes a variety of subjects and collectible items, too.
  • Record a video of you reading a story for a child in your life.
  • Randomly give a book to someone.

I’m currently reading two books. “First Burma Campaign: The First Ever Account of the Japanese Conquest of 1942” by Colonel E C V Foucar MC and “Spitfire: A Livy Nash Mystery” by M. L. Hule. Non-fiction and fiction books respectively dealing with WWII.


If you are interested in the WWII era of history, you may find these three pages of interest. 

  • The “World War II Sources” page is a constantly growing collection of more than 470 links to museums, memorials, websites, Facebook pages, Twitter feeds, and other sources with information on the World War II-era in history.
  • The “World War II Timeline” page expands almost daily and shows events leading up to WWII, as well as during the war. Events are broken down into the Pacific and European Theaters by date.
  • The About WWII page is a collection of links to posts that I have made over the years that are relevant to WWII.

Today is National Book Lover’s Day

NATIONAL-BOOK-LOVERS-DAY-–-August-9

(See my other Reading related posts) – Take today to enjoy a book! As said on the National Day Calander website:

[Today is] A day for all those who love to read, National Book Lovers Day encourages you to find your favorite reading place, a good book (whether it be fiction or non-fiction) and read the day away.

Their recommendations for observance:

Sit back, relax, and READ! Don’t forget to share the joy of reading with young people in your life. Inspire them with your favorite novel or find out about the last book they took off the shelf. Read to the littlest of the up and coming readers, too. And share what your reading too! Need more ways to celebrate? We’ve got them!

    • Shop for a new title to read or explore the shelves for one you would like to give.
    • Explore the shelves of used book stores. You might find an out of print tome that might become the highlight of your collection.
    • Discover the world of online book stores. Their stock includes a variety of subjects and collectible items, too.
    • Record a video of you reading a story for a child in your life.
    • Randomly give a book to someone.

I’m currently reading “Disarming Hitlers V Weapons: Bomb Disposal, the V1 and V2 rockets” by Chris Ransted.


If you are interested in the WWII era of history, you may find these three pages of interest. 

  • The “World War II Sources” page is a constantly growing collection of more than 440 links to museums, memorials, websites, Facebook pages, Twitter feeds, and other sources with information on the World War II-era in history.
  • The “World War II Timeline” page expands almost daily and shows events leading up to WWII, as well as during the war. Events are broken down into the Pacific and European Theaters by date.
  • The About WWII page is a collection of links to posts that I have made over the years that are relevant to WWII.

Free Books on Apple Books

Books

 (See my other Reading related posts) – Looking for more books to fill you ‘shelter-at-home’ time? Apple Books is offering several for free. What are free changes day-to-day, so check often. The books range across several categories.

 
Looking over those available, these are the ones that caught my eye:
 
Open Books on your Apple device then search “Free Books” to see the list. It is a very long list so adding more parameters to the search will help narrow the list down.
 
 
Further Reading
  1. Apple Books app: best free books to read during quarantine

If you are interested in the WWII era of history, you may find these three pages of interest. 

  • The “World War II Sources” page is a constantly growing collection of more than 380 links to museums, memorials, websites, Facebook pages, Twitter feeds and other sources with information on the World War II-era in history.
  • The “World War II Timeline” page expands almost daily and shows events leading up to WWII, as well as during the war. Events are broken down into the Pacific and European Theaters by date.
  • The About WWII page is a collection of links to posts that I have made over the years that are relevant to WWII.

 

Wattpad, more Free reading

Books

(See my other Reading related posts) – The ‘Shelter-in-place’ restriction is keeping most people at home. Many of them are looking for new sources of reading material but don’t want to spend a lot.

Wattpad is another source you may want to tap to fill your reading needs. Wattpad includes books from a wide range of genres. As they say on their website:

[Wattpad is] the world’s most-loved social storytelling platform
Wattpad connects a global community of 80 million readers and writers through the power of story.

Most, if not all, of the available books are by relatively unknown authors. In fact, if you have stories you want to share, this is one outlet for you.

Wattpad also had both Android and iOS Apps you can download for free.

 

Further Reading

  1. How to Read Free Ebooks With Wattpad

Do you read Science Fiction or Fantasy?

Updated 4/17/20

Screen Shot 2020-04-01 at 9.22.34 AM

(See my other Reading related posts) – I have been following Baen Books for a few years. I first posted about them several months back. With the current ‘shelter-in-place’ policy I thought it deserved another look.

Not only does Baen Books offer more than 70 eBooks for free download, but they also have dozens of short stories. And of course, you can buy ebooks through them as well at a low cost. There are more than 2200 books currently available from them. They also offer several different 7-book bundles for only $18 per bundle.

Some of the recent short stories are:

  1. “Waiting for the Talisman” by P.C. Hodgell https://www.baen.com/talisman 
  2. “Voodoo Magic” by Robert Buettner https://www.baen.com/voodoomagic
  3. “Burners” by Matt McHugh https://www.baen.com/burners 
  4. “Treason Properly” by J.J. Cragun https://www.baen.com/treason 
  5. “Talk Girl” by Wil McCarthy https://www.baen.com/talkgirl 
  6. “A Visit to the Galaxy Ballroom” by Sharon Lee and Steve Miller https://www.baen.com/galaxyballroom 
  7. “Next Giant Leap” by Patrick Chiles https://www.baen.com/nextgiantleap 
  8. “The Red Sea” by Mercedes Lackey & Cody Martin https://www.baen.com/redsea 
  9. “Adrift” by Frank Chadwick  https://www.baen.com/adriftfc 
  10. “The Policeman’s Daughter” by Wil McCarthy https://www.baen.com/policemansdaughter 
  11. “Peregoy’s Wolves” by Nancy Kress https://www.baen.com/peregoyswolves 

If you are looking for more eBooks to help pass the time at home, Baen is a good source!

All You Can Books Offers Audio and eBooks

(See my other Reading related posts) – I came across yet another source of ebooks and audiobooks. All You Can Read gives you UNLIMITED access to over 40,000 Audiobooks, eBooks, and Foreign Language courses. Download as many audiobooks, ebooks, language audio courses, and language e-workbooks as you want during the FREE trial and it’s all yours to keep even if you cancel during the FREE trial.

This gives you another option to fill your time at home under the quarantine.

Get eBooks from your library

Books

(See my other Reading related posts) – So many are currently confined at home. One of the activities that many are turning to is reading. Not everyone has a stack of books to turn to. Nor does everyone want to buy expensive additions for their library.

I came across the article “How-To Borrow eBooks for Your Entire Family: 4 Great Apps!“. Given our quarantined state, I thought that this was something worth sharing. The suggested Apps are:

  1. Overdrive – supports most local libraries
  2. 3M Cloud Library – supports many local libraries
  3. Kindle – many free titles, titles for purchase, Kindle Unlimited for a monthly fee
  4. Books (formerly iBooks) on Apple devices – many free titles, titles for purchase
  5. Other sources for free books are listed

 

Personally, I like Kindle for my reading. It is my go-to App on my iPad. I also use Books sometimes. I use it more to read PDF files than books on my iPad. I have not used the library services yet. I do need to find my library card and try them out. Have any of my readers tried these or other borrowing services?

Some of the notification services with free/ low-cost book offers I have used include:

  1. https://www.bookbub.com
  2. http://readcheaply.com/
  3. http://www.rifflebooks.com/select/
  4. http://eBooksHabit.com
  5. http://www.moreforlessonline.com
  6. http://www.ebooksgrowontrees.com
  7. http://booksends.com
  8. http://daily.ereaderiq.com/

These offers are not exactly for bestsellers, but the price is right and it does expose you to new authors.

Read More About History

Saved Image 2020-03-26 at 8.04.05 AM.png

(See my other Reading and History related posts) – I saw a Tweet today from History Extra that they were opening up their content. You can read their articles for free for the next two weeks without a subscription.

I checked them out and there are many topics covered. They have several articles and posts relevant to WWII. I’m going to be going over those in the next couple of weeks.


If you are interested in the WWII era of history, you may find these three pages of interest. 

  • The “World War II Sources” page is a constantly growing collection of more than 360 links to museums, memorials, websites, Facebook pages, Twitter feeds and other sources with information on the World War II-era in history.
  • The “World War II Timeline” page expands almost daily and shows events leading up to WWII, as well as during the war. Events are broken down into the Pacific and European Theaters by date.
  • The About WWII page is a collection of links to posts that I have made over the years that are relevant to WWII.