Tag Archives: Military

Book Review: “The Oppressed”

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(See all of my Book Reviews) – “The Oppressed” eBook was published in 2018 and was written by Matt Thomas. This is Mr. Thomas’ second publication. This is the first in his “Wroth Worlds” series.

I received an ARC of this novel through https://www.netgalley.com in return for a fair and honest review. I categorize this novel as ‘R’ because it contains scenes of Violence and Mature Language. The story is set in the far future. The primary character is Bryan Howe leader of Free Human Special Forces Detachment 8222.

Earth had been invaded and conquered by the Hetarek. Much of the human population on Earth has been exterminated. The remainder has become Hetarek slaves. A few from Earth escaped the Hetarek and, with the help of the Ahai, have fled to the stars. The Free Human forces have begun to fight back against the Hetarek. They have already taken a few systems, now they have set their sights on Earth.

Howe and his team are inserted on Earth to start building a guerrilla army to rise up and assist in an invasion of Earth. But Howe and his team have a difficult job. Not only do the Hetarek keep a close and ruthless watch on the remaining humans, but the humans consider Howe and his colleagues “Runners’. They are looked down upon because the humans that have survived on Earth feel that they were abandoned. With a generation having passed, it is difficult to recruit survivors to risk everything to support the ‘Runners’.

I thoroughly enjoyed the 11+ hours I spent reading this 375-page science fiction novel. I liked the plot of a conquered Earth being retaken. There is a lot of action and not all of the characters you start out with survive. This is just the beginning of the story of a much longer struggle. The cover art is OK, but I would have preferred something closer to the storyline. I give this novel a 5 out of 5.

My book reviews are also published on Goodreads (https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/31181778-john-purvis).

Mixer last night at the Texas Military Forces Museum

Last night I went to the Texas Military Forces Museum in Austin for their “June Tunes Mabry Mixer: Granville Automatic”.

There were light refreshments as well as the music from “Granville Automatic”. We could also look around the museum. The selfie above was taken in front of their M3A1 Light Tank.

If the Texas Military Forces Museum interests you, it is open Tuesday thru Sunday 10AM to 4PM. Admission is FREE.

On July 20 they will host a special “Hands-On History” event from 6PM – 9PM. There is a $5 charge for that event, with kids 6 and under free. The event is also free to members of the museum. The event will allow visitors to:

  • climb in tanks and sit in a cockpit
  • hold muskets, bazookas, and machine guns
  • learn about weapons and equipment used from 1812 to the present

Check the website for further details.

Friday WWII Flix: “36 Hours of Hell”

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(See my other WWII related posts) – I came across the movie “36 Hours of Hell” a while back on YouTube. I watched it last night and to say I was disappointed is an understatement. I was surprised that it had earned a 5/10 on IMDB. Honestly, I would not have been surprised if it had been rated a 3. The synopsis per IMDB:

A ragtag bunch of US marines is sent into the Pacific Island of Rabaul to clear any remaining Japanese forces after the heavy bombing. They meet fierce resistance.

The movie was made in Itlay, but all dialog is in English. If you still want to watch it, the movie was still available on YouTube as indicated below at the time of this post.


If you are interested in the WWII era of history, you may find these two pages of mine of interest. 

The  World War II Sources” page is a collection of more than 310 links to museums, memorials, websites, Facebook pages, Twitter feeds and other sources with information on the World War II era in history.

The “World War II Timeline” page shows events leading up to WWII, as well as during the war. Events are broken down into the Pacific and European Theaters by date.

3D Comparison of WWII German Armor

(See my other WWII related posts) – I came across this very well done 8:05 video comparing the various German armor vehicles in World War II. This was published on YouTube in February of 2019 by AmazingViz.


If you are interested in the WWII era of history, you may find these two pages of mine of interest. 

The  World War II Sources” page is a collection of more than 310 links to museums, memorials, websites, Facebook pages, Twitter feeds and other sources with information on the World War II era in history.

The “World War II Timeline” page shows events leading up to WWII, as well as during the war. Events are broken down into the Pacific and European Theaters by date.

Friday WWII Flix: “La Dernière Section”

(See my other WWII and Short Films related posts) – I came across this short 9:24 video set in WWII “La Dernière Section” a while back. It was uploaded to YouTube in February of 2012 by SnakeMajin – WAW Production. While this is a French production, there was little dialog in the video.

I liked the action in the video, though the fact that none of the weapons were really being fired (bolts not moving, no empty cartridges ejected) did diminish the quality of the film.

The Numbers for D-Day

(See my other WWII posts) – I came across the article “D-Day by the numbers: Here’s what it took 75 years ago to pull off the biggest amphibious invasion in history” and wanted to share it. It contains some interesting facts about the D-Day invasion force.

Some of the high points:

  • 11,590 Allied aircraft flew 14,674 sorties during the invasion
  • 15,500 American and 7,900 British airborne troops jumped into France
  • 6,939 naval vessels manned by 195,700 sailors took part in the beach assault
  • 132,715 Allied troops landed at five beaches in Normandy
  • Total casualties for both sides in the Battle of Normandy (June 6 – 25, 1944) were approximately 425,000
  • By June 11 (D+5), 326,547 troops, 54,186 vehicles and 104,428 tons of supplies had been unloaded in France

Read the full article for more details and photos.


If you are interested in the WWII era of history, you may find these two pages of mine of interest. 

The  World War II Sources” page is a collection of more than 310 links to museums, memorials, websites, Facebook pages, Twitter feeds and other sources with information on the World War II era in history.

The “World War II Timeline” page shows events leading up to WWII, as well as during the war. Events are broken down into the Pacific and European Theaters by date.

75th Anniversary of D-Day

(See my other WWII posts) – Today marks the 75th anniversary of D-Day, the Allied invasion of France in 1944. This 20:55 video was published to YouTube in June of 2017 by Yesterday Today, but it is certainly still a very good look back at D-Day.

From the post description:

The Normandy landings (codenamed Operation Neptune) were the landing operations on Tuesday, 6 June 1944 (termed D-Day) of the Allied invasion of Normandy in Operation Overlord during World War II. The largest seaborne invasion in history, the operation began the liberation of German-occupied northwestern Europe from Nazi control, and contributed to the Allied victory on the Western Front.

On D-Day, the Allies landed around 156,000 troops in Normandy. The American forces landed numbered 73,000: 23,250 on Utah Beach, 34,250 on Omaha Beach, and 15,500 airborne troops. In the British and Canadian sector, 83,115 troops were landed: 24,970 on Gold Beach, 21,400 on Juno Beach, 28,845 on Sword Beach, and 7900 airborne troops.

11,590 aircraft were available to support the landings. On D-Day, Allied aircraft flew 14,674 sorties, and 127 were lost.

In the airborne landings on both flanks of the beaches, 2,395 aircraft and 867 gliders of the RAF and USAAF were used on D-Day.

Operation Neptune involved huge naval forces, including 6,939 vessels: 1,213 naval combat ships, 4,126 landing ships and landing craft, 736 ancillary craft and 864 merchant vessels. Some 195,700 personnel were assigned to Operation Neptune: 52,889 US, 112,824 British, and 4,988 from other Allied countries.

By the end of 11 June (D + 5), 326,547 troops, 54,186 vehicles and 104,428 tons of supplies had been landed on the beaches. 


If you are interested in the WWII era of history, you may find these two pages of mine of interest. 

The  World War II Sources” page is a collection of more than 310 links to museums, memorials, websites, Facebook pages, Twitter feeds and other sources with information on the World War II era in history.

The “World War II Timeline” page shows events leading up to WWII, as well as during the war. Events are broken down into the Pacific and European Theaters by date.

Interesting Specialty Tanks of D-Day

(See my other WWII posts) – I came across the article “The Bunker Buster, Crocodile and the Crab: ‘Hobart’s Funnies’ – weird and wonderful tanks that played a vital role in the D-Day landings” today and thought that it was worth sharing. I had read about some these tanks before, but this article brought others to light.

A number of specialty tanks were developed specifically for the D-Day landing. These were developed under the direction of Sir Percy Hobart. Hobart was well known for unconventional thinking as well as for both asking for and accepting advice from anyone. Hobart was promoted to the rank of Major General at the beginning of WWII and was responsible for forming the unconventional Desert Rats in North Africa. Later in the war, Winston Churchill appointed Hobart to the training of British Armoured Divisions. In 1943 Hobart was tasked with converting the 79th Armoured Division into a unit of specialized armor in preparation for D-Day.

Among these tanks were the:

Churchill_Crocodile_01
The Crocodile – flame thrower tank

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The Crab – flailing chains to clear mines

 

(No image) The Bunker Buster – spigot mortar for demolition

DD-Tank
The DD – amphibious tank with dual drives

AVRE-Bobbin

 

 

 

 

 

The Bobbin – laid a carpet allowing conventional vehicles to follow

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Examples of these are currently featured at the Bovington Tank Museum in the UK. 


If you are interested in the WWII era of history, you may find these two pages of mine of interest. 

The  World War II Sources” page is a collection of more than 300 links to museums, memorials, websites, Facebook pages, Twitter feeds and other sources with information on the World War II era in history.

The “World War II Timeline” page shows events leading up to WWII, as well as during the war. Events are broken down into the Pacific and European Theaters by date.

Armed Forces Day – 18 May 2019

Today is Armed Forces Day. Please help recognize those who serve. GP Cox does a good job of telling about Armed Forces Day in his post that I am reblogging.

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18 MAY, 2019, BEING ANOTHER PART OF MILITARY APPRECIATION MONTH, IS CALLED ARMED FORCES DAY.

THE FIRST ARMED FORCES DAY WAS CELEBRATED 29 MAY 1950 (one month before the start of the Korean War).  ARMED FORCES WEEK BEGINS ON THE 2ND SATURDAY OF MAY AND ENDS THRU THE 3RD SATURDAY.  Due to their unique schedules, the NATIONAL GUARD & THE RESERVE units may celebrate this at any time during the month.

18 May 2019

PRESIDENT DWIGHT DAVID EISENHOWER, 1953 –  “Today let us, as Americans, honor the American fighting man.  For it is he or she – the soldier, the sailor, the Airman, the Marine – who has fought to preserve freedom.”

If you do NOT normally fly your flag everyday, make this day one that you do!  Even a small one sitting in your window shows your heartfelt feelings toward our troops.

If you are not from the U.S…

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