Category Archives: Video

WWII in 13 Minutes – A Crash Course

I came across the 13:12 video “World War II: Crash Course World History” a few days ago.   While the presentation is not the most serious, this would be a good video to use in introducing WWII to kids. It was uploaded to YouTube in October of 2012 by CrashCourse. Their description of the video:

John Green teaches you about World War II, aka The Great Patriotic War, aka The Big One. So how did this war happen? And what does it mean? We’ve all learned the facts about World War II many times over, thanks to repeated classroom coverage, the History channel, and your grandfather (or maybe great-grandfather) showing you that Nazi bayonet he used to keep in his sock drawer and telling you a bunch of age-inappropriate stories about his harrowing war experiences. So, why did the Axis powers think forceful expansion was a good idea? (they were hungry). So why did this thing shake out in favor of the Allies? HInt: it has to do with the fact that it was a world war. Germany and Japan made some pretty serious strategic errors, such as invading Russia and attacking the United States, and those errors meant that pretty much the whole world was against them. So, find out how this worldwide alliance came together to stop the Axis expansion. All this, plus Canada finally gets the respectful treatment it deserves.


If you are interested in the WWII era of history, you may find these three pages of interest. 

  • The “World War II Sources” page is a constantly growing collection of more than 360 links to museums, memorials, websites, Facebook pages, Twitter feeds and other sources with information on the World War II-era in history.
  • The “World War II Timeline” page expands almost daily and shows events leading up to WWII, as well as during the war. Events are broken down into the Pacific and European Theaters by date.
  • The About WWII page is a collection of links to posts that I have made over the years that are relevant to WWII.

Music Popular in WWII: “We’ll Meet Again”

Singer Vera Lynn (now Dame Vera Lynn) made “We’ll Meet Again” famous in 1939. She is best known for this song. During the Phoney War, the London based tabloid Daily Express ran a poll of servicemen for their favorite musical performer. Vera Lynn came out as the top choice and she became known as “the Forces’ Sweetheart”.

The English songwriters Ross Parker and Hughie Charles composed the music and wrote the lyrics fo “We’ll Meet Again”. It is considered to be one of the most famous songs of the WWII era.

Dame Vera Lynn celebrated her 103rd birthday on March 20, 2020. She holds the record for being the oldest person to top the album charts.


If you are interested in the WWII era of history, you may find these three pages of interest. 

  • The “World War II Sources” page is a constantly growing collection of more than 360 links to museums, memorials, websites, Facebook pages, Twitter feeds and other sources with information on the World War II-era in history.
  • The “World War II Timeline” page expands almost daily and shows events leading up to WWII, as well as during the war. Events are broken down into the Pacific and European Theaters by date.
  • The About WWII page is a collection of links to posts that I have made over the years that are relevant to WWII.

WWII Documentaries Available On-Line for Free

If you or your students, kids, adults are looking for things to do to stay occupied, please know ALL our World War II films are available to watch for free on your computer, tablet or smart phone @WWIIFoundation 2020-03-20 at 9.32.34 AM

I saw a tweet from @WWIIFoundation a short time ago that I thought was worth sharing. It said:

If you or your students, kids, adults are looking for things to do to stay occupied, please know ALL our World War II films are available to watch for free on your computer, tablet or smartphone.

If you visit their website (https://wwiifoundation.org/) you will find nearly 30 documentary videos covering WWII. This website offers something to fill some of the time while we are confined at home and to learn more about WWII.


If you are interested in the WWII era of history, you may find these three pages of interest. 

  • The “World War II Sources” page is a constantly growing collection of more than 360 links to museums, memorials, websites, Facebook pages, Twitter feeds and other sources with information on the World War II-era in history.
  • The “World War II Timeline” page expands almost daily and shows events leading up to WWII, as well as during the war. Events are broken down into the Pacific and European Theaters by date.
  • The About WWII page is a collection of links to posts that I have made over the years that are relevant to WWII.

Customizing your Mac Mail Signature

I thought that this short video (06:06) from MacMost was a good start to customizing your mail signatures under macOS.

You can actually do far more than that. The Mail signature files for macOS Catalina are found in /Users/[your user ID]/Library/Mail/V7/MailData/Signatures/. This is an HTML file, so you can take advantage of that to further customize your signature. 
 
Select a signature file to customize. Apple’s naming convention for signature files is not intuitive. I recommend that you create a new signature file.
  • Open Mail then go to Preferences > Signatures > enter “+” to add a new signature
  • Type in the text you want to appear
  • Close Preferences
  • Quit Mail
Now in your Finder go to /Users/[your user ID]/Library/Mail/V7/MailData/Signatures/. Select the file with today’s date and open it for editing.  I use BBEdit for this.
 
The file is larger than you might expect. Insert the HTML you want for customizing the signature. I added a table with one row and two data fields. The field on the left has artwork, the field on the right now has my text. Save the file. 
 
In Finder select the updated file and Right-Click (or Control-Click) on it. Select “Get Info”. Now click on the “Locked” box. If you do not do this, Mail will overwrite the changes you made to the Signature file. 
 
Now open Mail and you will find the updated signature is ready for use. One of my signatures now looks like the image below. It now identifies the topics I most often post about on my Blog – Mac & iOS, WWII, and Books. Those interests are also reflected in a simple image.

Screen Shot 2020-03-15 at 3.46.14 PM


See my other macOS posts


 

Animated Pursuit and Sinking of the Bismark

I came across the 10:22 timelapse video depicting the pursuit and sinking of the German battleship Bismark yesterday. It was uploaded to YouTube in July of 2019 by The Operations Room. While I have read the story a few times, seeing how it played out gives more depth to what happened.


If you are interested in the WWII era of history, you may find these three pages of interest. 

  • The “World War II Sources” page is a constantly growing collection of more than 360 links to museums, memorials, websites, Facebook pages, Twitter feeds and other sources with information on the World War II-era in history.
  • The “World War II Timeline” page expands almost daily and shows events leading up to WWII, as well as during the war. Events are broken down into the Pacific and European Theaters by date.
  • The About WWII page is a collection of links to posts that I have made over the years that are relevant to WWII.

Preview has many hidden capabilities for PDF files

(See my other macOS related posts) – I have posted about MacMost before. Today I watched this video “12 Things you may not know you can do with Preview”. I had been familiar with some of the abilities of Preview, but I learned a few new things from this video.

For me, I particularly like the ability to merge PDF files and annotate them with highlights and notes. As I write various articles, this is very handy.

Preview has so many abilities that few people are aware of. Instead of buying Apps, Preview often will give you what you need directly from Apple. You just have to take some time to familiarize yourself with the App. MacMost does a good job of that in this video.


See my new macOS Software Directory and find what software is available for the Mac!

Storming the Beaches at Normandy ’44 – Lego Stop Motion

I came across this 04:26 video today and wanted to share it. Lego figures and stop motion software are used to ‘recreate’ the landing at Normandy June 6, 1944. The video “Lego D-Day – The Battle for Omaha Beach” was uploaded to YouTube in February of 2020 by JD Brick Productions. There are several other (though not WWII) short stop motion films at their YouTube site.


If you are interested in the WWII era of history, you may find these three pages of interest. 

  • The “World War II Sources” page is a constantly growing collection of more than 360 links to museums, memorials, websites, Facebook pages, Twitter feeds and other sources with information on the World War II-era in history.
  • The “World War II Timeline” page expands almost daily and shows events leading up to WWII, as well as during the war. Events are broken down into the Pacific and European Theaters by date.
  • The About WWII page is a collection of links to posts that I have made over the years that are relevant to WWII.

Video Tutorials from MacMost – learn something new in about 10 minutes

Screen Shot 2020-02-14 at 1.20.36 PM

(See my other Mac and OS X related posts) – I have been an email subscriber to MacMost for quite a while. That delivers an email once a week with links to a handful of their video tutorials.

The featured 10:46 tutorial this week (released 2/14/20) is “8 Better Alternatives to Sending Large Email Attachments”.

I don’t watch all of their tutorials, but there are several that I have found very interesting. If you visit their website and the Video Tutorials page, you will find more than 60 categories and more than 1800 individual tutorials. Another option is to visit their channel on YouTube.

Either way, you want to approach them, MacMost has a wide selection of tutorials that will enable you to know more about your Mac! Most of these are only 5-15 minutes in length so it is easy to allocate time during your day to watch at lease one.