Category Archives: Podcast

History Extra Podcast: A Nazi serial killer

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(See my other Podcast related posts) – I found the History Extra podcasts a couple of weeks ago. I spent some time culling through them looking for WWII related topics.

Another early episode I found is “A Nazi serial killer and a Tudor gentleman“. In this episode, there is a short (9 minute) discussion at the beginning about a serial killer in WWII Berlin. The episode brings up the interesting problem of increased crime during blackouts. I have not read much about this happening in the UK, but I am sure that it did. I thought it gave some interesting views on the home front challenges.


If you are interested in the WWII era of history, you may find these three pages of interest. 

  • The “World War II Sources” page is a constantly growing collection of more than 370 links to museums, memorials, websites, Facebook pages, Twitter feeds and other sources with information on the World War II-era in history.
  • The “World War II Timeline” page expands almost daily and shows events leading up to WWII, as well as during the war. Events are broken down into the Pacific and European Theaters by date.
  • The About WWII page is a collection of links to posts that I have made over the years that are relevant to WWII.

History Extra Podcast – Secrets of WWII

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(See my other Podcast related posts) – I found the History Extra podcasts a couple of weeks ago. I spent some time culling through them looking for WWII related topics.

One of the early episodes I found is “Secrets of WWII, the French Revolution and ‘The History of Scotland’“. In this episode, there is a short (15 minute) discussion of some of the secret dealings with Stalin. I thought it gave some interesting insights.


If you are interested in the WWII era of history, you may find these three pages of interest. 

  • The “World War II Sources” page is a constantly growing collection of more than 370 links to museums, memorials, websites, Facebook pages, Twitter feeds and other sources with information on the World War II-era in history.
  • The “World War II Timeline” page expands almost daily and shows events leading up to WWII, as well as during the war. Events are broken down into the Pacific and European Theaters by date.
  • The About WWII page is a collection of links to posts that I have made over the years that are relevant to WWII.

What do surviving kamikaze pilots think

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(See my other Podcast related posts) – I came across the History Extra Podcasts a few weeks ago. I searched for any related to WWII and among those I found is “The Last Kamikazes“.

In this episode, BBC journalist Mariko OiMariko Oi talks about her interviews with surviving Japanese Kamikaze pilots. This was a promotion of her documentary on BBC World Service.

We often hear from the Allied point of view the impact of the Kamikazes. I found the views of these Japanese survivors interesting.


If you are interested in the WWII era of history, you may find these three pages of interest. 

  • The “World War II Sources” page is a constantly growing collection of more than 370 links to museums, memorials, websites, Facebook pages, Twitter feeds and other sources with information on the World War II-era in history.
  • The “World War II Timeline” page expands almost daily and shows events leading up to WWII, as well as during the war. Events are broken down into the Pacific and European Theaters by date.
  • The About WWII page is a collection of links to posts that I have made over the years that are relevant to WWII.

History Extra Podcast: “Germany’s World War Two”

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(See my other Podcast related posts) – After seeing that the History Extra was promoting free access, I checked out some of their podcasts. I listened to the 50 minute “Germany’s World War Two” and found it very interesting.

It was released in July of 2017. Professor Nicholas Stargardt talks on how WWII was experienced by ordinary Germans. He published the book The German War that covers the same topic in 2015. He is aa Professor of History at Oxford University.


If you are interested in the WWII era of history, you may find these three pages of interest. 

  • The “World War II Sources” page is a constantly growing collection of more than 370 links to museums, memorials, websites, Facebook pages, Twitter feeds and other sources with information on the World War II-era in history.
  • The “World War II Timeline” page expands almost daily and shows events leading up to WWII, as well as during the war. Events are broken down into the Pacific and European Theaters by date.
  • The About WWII page is a collection of links to posts that I have made over the years that are relevant to WWII.

Read More About History

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(See my other Reading and History related posts) – I saw a Tweet today from History Extra that they were opening up their content. You can read their articles for free for the next two weeks without a subscription.

I checked them out and there are many topics covered. They have several articles and posts relevant to WWII. I’m going to be going over those in the next couple of weeks.


If you are interested in the WWII era of history, you may find these three pages of interest. 

  • The “World War II Sources” page is a constantly growing collection of more than 360 links to museums, memorials, websites, Facebook pages, Twitter feeds and other sources with information on the World War II-era in history.
  • The “World War II Timeline” page expands almost daily and shows events leading up to WWII, as well as during the war. Events are broken down into the Pacific and European Theaters by date.
  • The About WWII page is a collection of links to posts that I have made over the years that are relevant to WWII.

Podcast: “The History of WWII Podcast”

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(You may be interested in my other Podcast  related posts) – I came across “The History of WWII Podcast” a few weeks back and have started listening to them from the beginning. This is a series of very detailed talks about WWII by Ray Harris (Ray Harris Jr; has a degree in history from James Madison University. He has been obsessed with the events and people from WWII since he first learned of them.). To give you some perspective, episode 32 covers the aftermath in France after Dunkirk. There are several podcasts in the series. Episode 281 was just released on March 3, 2020.

A new episode is released every two weeks. Episodes are usually in the 30-45 minute range in length. The podcast began in January of 2012.

If you are interested in the history of WWII I recommend this podcast.


If you are interested in the WWII era of history, you may find these three pages of interest. 

  • The “World War II Sources” page is a constantly growing collection of more than 360 links to museums, memorials, websites, Facebook pages, Twitter feeds and other sources with information on the World War II-era in history.
  • The “World War II Timeline” page expands almost daily and shows events leading up to WWII, as well as during the war. Events are broken down into the Pacific and European Theaters by date.
  • The About WWII page is a collection of links to posts that I have made over the years that are relevant to WWII.

Podcast: “We Have Ways of Making You Talk”

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(See my other Podcasts related posts) – I like to listen to podcasts while I am out walking. One of the newer ones I have begun following is “We Have Ways to Make You Talk”. This is a production by James Holland and Al Murray. From their website:

Achtung! Achtung! Comedian Al Murray and historian James Holland are creating a new podcast all about the Second World War. We Have Ways of Making You Talk will be a weekly show exploring the war in close up. The two men will tell battlefield tales and bring forgotten events back into sharp focus. If you’re looking for a comprehensive history, marching through events date by date, forget it.  We Have Ways of Making You Talk will roam down forgotten front lines, cast new villains and make the case for unlikely heroes. Each week will also see Al and James bring along a World War Two artifact which will be poked, prodded and examined, before having its full story told. Battle stations!

These are frequently released episodes, but typically only last 10-50 minutes. These two cover all sorts of issues mostly answering questions from listeners. There are more than 80 podcasts ready for you to listen to. If you are interested in WWII history you will find this podcast of interest. Just to give you an idea of what you will find in this podcast, the first few episodes are names are:

  1. The Spitfire, the Major and Monte Cassino
  2. Rations, the Ritz and Nazi FM
  3. Machine guns, Nazi menswear and an Italian massacre
  4. Arnhem, Eastwood and Normandy antics

If you are interested in the WWII era of history, you may find these three pages of interest. 

  • The “World War II Sources” page is a constantly growing collection of more than 340 links to museums, memorials, websites, Facebook pages, Twitter feeds and other sources with information on the World War II-era in history.
  • The “World War II Timeline” page expands almost daily and shows events leading up to WWII, as well as during the war. Events are broken down into the Pacific and European Theaters by date.
  • The About WWII page is a collection of links to posts that I have made over the years that are relevant to WWII.

WWII History Podcast: The 6888th Postal Battalion

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(See my other WWII related posts) – While driving across country recently my wife and I listened to several episodes of the Stuff You Missed in History podcast. One that I wanted to share is related to WWII and deals with the 6888th Central Postal Directory Battalion. 

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The 6888th was an all-black Women’s Army Corps (WAC). unit. It was the only all-black, all-female battalion to serve overseas during WWII. The battalion was organized to work through the large backlog of undelivered mail addressed to troops serving in the European Theater. They arrived in England in February of 1945, then later moved their operation to France. 

I thought that this was an interesting story from the WWII era that few had heard about. If you are interested you can find the episode here. 

(Top image “Battalion Commander Maj. Charity Adams and Executive Officer Capt. Abbie Noel Campbell inspect the first Soldiers of the 6888th Central Postal Directory Battalion to arrive in England, February 15, 1945.” from Flickr. The second image “Members of the 6888th Central Postal Directory Battalion take part in a parade ceremony in honor of Joan d’Arc at the marketplace where she was burned at the stake“. )


After I released the original post I received this Tweet from Cummings & Cummings LLC (@ccllc2008) and wanted add it to this post:

Support the 6888th Congressional Gold Metal Bill; need #67votes to pass in the #Senate and #290votes to pass the House of Representatives. Eight known #SixTripleEight veterans are still alive


If you are interested in the WWII era of history, you may find these three pages of interest. 

  • The “World War II Sources” page is a constantly growing collection of more than 340 links to museums, memorials, websites, Facebook pages, Twitter feeds and other sources with information on the World War II-era in history.
  • The “World War II Timeline” page expands almost daily and shows events leading up to WWII, as well as during the war. Events are broken down into the Pacific and European Theaters by date.
  • The About WWII page is a collection of links to posts that I have made over the years that are relevant to WWII.

Missed in History Podcast: “The Night Witches”

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While traveling with my wife during the past few weeks we listened to several episodes of the Missed in History Class podcast. This particular show was on The Night Witches. Per the Missed in History website:

The Night Witches were an all-female bombing regiment in the Soviet Air Force. Flying biplanes meant for dusting crops and training new recruits, they dropped 23,000 tons of bombs on German forces in WWII.

If you are interested, you can listen to this 32-minute podcast at https://www.missedinhistory.com/podcasts/the-night-witches.htm. It gives a view of WWII from a perspective that many have missed.


If you are interested in the WWII era of history, you may find these three pages of interest. 

The  World War II Sources” page is a constantly growing collection of more than 330 links to museums, memorials, websites, Facebook pages, Twitter feeds and other sources with information on the World War II-era in history.

The “World War II Timeline” page expands almost daily and shows events leading up to WWII, as well as during the war. Events are broken down into the Pacific and European Theaters by date.

The “About WWII” page is a collection of links to posts that I have made over the years that are relevant to WWII.

The US 1944 Ghost Army

(See my other WWII & Podcast  related posts) – While driving across the country with my wife a week or so ago we listened to several Missed in History Class podcasts. One that I wanted to share was on “The Ghost Army”.

The Ghost Army refers to a special and very secret tactical deception unit, officially named the 1st Headquarters Special Troops. This 1100 man unit was given the mission of impersonating other US units and deceiving the Germans. They participated in more than 20 battlefield deceptions between early 1944 and the end of the war.

The members of the unit were recruited for their artistic and creative thinking skills. They used dummy tanks and artillery, fake aircraft, and giant speakers broadcasting the sounds of men and artillery to make the German forces believe they were facing far larger forces than they were. The unit was kept “Secret” for more than 40 years.

If you are interested in the unit, you can listen to the 34 minute Missed In History Class podcast here.

Recently I read the book “Secret Soldiers: How the U.S. Twenty-Third Special Troops Fooled the Nazis” that goes into this unit further.


If you are interested in the WWII era of history, you may find these three pages of interest. 

The  World War II Sources” page is a constantly growing collection of more than 330 links to museums, memorials, websites, Facebook pages, Twitter feeds and other sources with information on the World War II-era in history.

The “World War II Timeline” page expands almost daily and shows events leading up to WWII, as well as during the war. Events are broken down into the Pacific and European Theaters by date.

The “About WWII” page is a collection of links to posts that I have made over the years that are relevant to WWII.