Category Archives: Music

Music of WWII: “Tuxedo Junction”

(See my other Music related posts) – The song “Tuxedo Junction” was written by Erskine Hawkins, Bill Johnson, Julian Dash with lyrics by Buddy Feyne. It was first performed by the college dance band Erskine Hawkins & His Orchestra in the late 1930s.

In February of 1940, Glenn Miller and His Orchestra recorded the song and it hit #1 on Billboard. While this wasn’t WWII yet for the US, the war had been going on for nearly six months in Europe.


If you are interested in the WWII era of history, you may find these three pages of interest. 

  • The “World War II Sources” page is a constantly growing collection of more than 360 links to museums, memorials, websites, Facebook pages, Twitter feeds and other sources with information on the World War II-era in history.
  • The “World War II Timeline” page expands almost daily and shows events leading up to WWII, as well as during the war. Events are broken down into the Pacific and European Theaters by date.
  • The About WWII page is a collection of links to posts that I have made over the years that are relevant to WWII.

Music of WWII: “Bless ‘Em All”

(See my other Music related posts) – The lyrics of “Bless ‘Em All” are credited to Fred Godfrey to music composed by Robert Kewley in 1917, though there is some question about that. It was first recorded by George Formby, Jr. in 1940.

The lyrics have gone through a few iterations, with some being less acceptable to the public than others. It was popular with British and Commonwealth troops during WWII.


If you are interested in the WWII era of history, you may find these three pages of interest. 

  • The “World War II Sources” page is a constantly growing collection of more than 340 links to museums, memorials, websites, Facebook pages, Twitter feeds and other sources with information on the World War II-era in history.
  • The “World War II Timeline” page expands almost daily and shows events leading up to WWII, as well as during the war. Events are broken down into the Pacific and European Theaters by date.
  • The About WWII page is a collection of links to posts that I have made over the years that are relevant to WWII.

“THIS IS THE ARMY” conclusion

And here is the second part of the good post by GP Cox.


If you are interested in the WWII era of history, you may find these three pages of interest.

  • The “World War II Sources” page is a constantly growing collection of more than 340 links to museums, memorials, websites, Facebook pages, Twitter feeds and other sources with information on the World War II-era in history.
  • The “World War II Timeline” page expands almost daily and shows events leading up to WWII, as well as during the war. Events are broken down into the Pacific and European Theaters by date.
  • The About WWII page is a collection of links to posts that I have made over the years that are relevant to WWII.

 

Pacific Paratrooper

After touring the English provinces, the company went to North Africa for two weeks and then sailed for Italy. This Is the Army was presented at the San Carlo Opera House in Naples in early April 1944. The group arrived in Rome by truck only six days after the Eternal City fell to the Allies. The musical was presented twice a day at the Royal Opera House in June.

Egypt was the next stop in early August, with This Is the Army being performed at the Cairo Opera House until the end of the month. September and October were spent in Iran. The company then traveled to the vast Pacific Theater, with New Guinea the first stop at the end of December 1944.

The company eventually landed at Guam in early August 1945, days before the first atomic bomb was dropped on Japan. A number of island-hopping stops followed, from…

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“THIS IS THE ARMY!” part one (1)

I thought that this story by GP Cox was worth reblogging. It gives a different look at the war years.


If you are interested in the WWII era of history, you may find these three pages of interest. 

  • The “World War II Sources” page is a constantly growing collection of more than 340 links to museums, memorials, websites, Facebook pages, Twitter feeds and other sources with information on the World War II-era in history.
  • The “World War II Timeline” page expands almost daily and shows events leading up to WWII, as well as during the war. Events are broken down into the Pacific and European Theaters by date.
  • The About WWII page is a collection of links to posts that I have made over the years that are relevant to WWII.

 

Pacific Paratrooper

“This Is The Army”

The most successful and popular patriotic show of World War II and one of the most unique productions in the history of entertainment was Irving Berlin’s This Is the Army, which originally began as a Broadway musical. General George C. Marshall gave Berlin permission to stage a morale-boosting revue early in 1942 to raise money for the military.

Rehearsals were held at Camp Upton, New York, beginning in the spring of 1942 in an old Civilian Conservation Corps barracks called T-11. At one end was a large recreation room with a stone fireplace, where Berlin placed his special piano.  It was next to a latrine, which had a hot water tank. Berlin liked to lean against the tank to warm his back.

Rehearsal

Berlin completed most of the score by the end of April. The show was then auditioned on Governor’s Island in New York…

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Chewbacca Sings “Silent Night”

(See my other Music & Star Wars related posts) – I know Christmas is over for this year, but I just didn’t want to wait a year to post this. The above video was posted to YouTube in December of 2016 by How It Should Have Ended and that video has, as you might expect, almost 8.5 million views. The video was created by James Covenant.

The music though was created back in 1999 by Scott Andersen. You can read his story and download the original audio track from his website.

Music of WWII: “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas”

(See my other Music related posts) – The song “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas” was written in 1943 by Hugh Martin and Ralph Blane. It was introduced by Judy Garland in the 1944 musical movie Meet Me in St. Louis. The song was released as a single and was very popular with US troops during the Christmas season of 1944 though it did not reach the top of the Billboard music chart.


If you are interested in the WWII era of history, you may find these three pages of interest. 

  • The “World War II Sources” page is a constantly growing collection of more than 340 links to museums, memorials, websites, Facebook pages, Twitter feeds and other sources with information on the World War II-era in history.
  • The “World War II Timeline” page expands almost daily and shows events leading up to WWII, as well as during the war. Events are broken down into the Pacific and European Theaters by date.
  • The About WWII page is a collection of links to posts that I have made over the years that are relevant to WWII.

WWII Music: “White Christmas” by Bing Crosby

 

(See my other Music related posts) – The song “White Christmas” was written by Irving Berlin and was first performed on Christmas Day in 1941. The original 1942 release of the record was No. 1 on the US charts for 11 weeks. beginning in October. It became the most popular Christmas song of 1942.

According to the Guinness Book of World Records, the version sung by Bing Crosby is the best-selling single of all time, with estimated sales in excess of 50 million copies worldwide.